Refrains, methodologies & theory

Some more additions to the library collections…

Assign & Arrange : methodologies of presentation in art & dance
Maren Butte, et al (ed)

700.1 ASS
Main Book Collection

Assign & Arrange: Methodologies of Presentation in Art and Dance aims to map the exchanges and transgressions between art and dance that characterize the manifold variety of relations between art and dance that can be observed today: dance performances taking place in art galleries or public spaces, for example, or visual artists developing specific presentational formats or exhibition displays that generate dimensions of dramaturgy and choreography for their visitors. Terms like mise-en-scène, situation, setting, choreography, and installation are being almost coevally used not only by theoreticians but also by contributors from both art and dance in order to define modes of presentation or to specify visitors’ aesthetic experience. Taking into account historical and current examples, and involving perspectives from art history, dance studies, and architecture, the book explores similarities and differences in the respective practices, as well as in the theoretical concepts they correspond with.

Source: http://www.sternberg-press.com/index.php?pageId=1534&bookId=428&l=en, 23/6/15

Refrains fro moving bodies : experience & experiment in affective spaces
Derek P. McCormack

304.2 MCC
Main Book Collection

In Refrains for Moving Bodies, Derek P. McCormack explores the kinds of experiments with experience that can take place in the affective spaces generated when bodies move. Drawing out new connections between thinkers including Henri Lefebvre, William James, John Dewey, Gregory Bateson, Felix Guattari, and Gilles Deleuze, McCormack argues for a critically affirmative experimentalism responsive to the opportunities such spaces provide for rethinking and remaking maps of experience. Foregrounding the rhythmic and atmospheric qualities of these spaces, he demonstrates the particular value of Deleuze and Guattari’s concept of the “refrain” for thinking and diagramming affect, bodies, and space-times together in creative ways, putting this concept to work to animate empirical encounters with practices and technologies as varied as dance therapy, choreography, radio sports commentary, and music video. What emerges are geographies of experimental participation that perform and disclose inventive ways of thinking within the myriad spaces where the affective capacities of bodies are modulated through moving.

Source: https://www.dukeupress.edu/Refrains-for-Moving-Bodies/index-viewby=title.html, 23/6/15

Dance [and] Theory
Gabriele Brandstetter & Gabriele Klein (ed.)

Dance [and] Theory

792.801 DAN
Main Book Collection

Both the identity of dance and that of theory are at risk as soon as the two intertwine. This anthology collects observations by choreographers and scholars, dancers, dramaturges and dance theorists in an effort to trace the multiple ways in which dance and theory correlate and redefine each other: What is the nature of their relationship? How can we outline a theory of dance from our particular historical perspective which will cover dance both as a practice and as an academic concept?
The contributions examine which concepts, interdependencies and discontinuities of dance and theory are relevant today and promise to engage us in the future. They address crucial topics of the current debate in dance and performance studies such as artistic research, aesthetics, politics, visuality, archives, and the next generation.

Source: http://www.transcript-verlag.de/978-3-8376-2151-8/dance-and-theory, 23/6/15

Martha Graham : gender & the haunting of a dance pioneer
Victoria Thoms

792.82092 GRA THO
Main Book Collection

In her heyday, Martha Graham’s name was internationally recognized within the modern dance world, and though trends in choreography continue to change, her status in dance still inspires regard.  In this, the first extended critical look at this modern dance pioneer, Victoria Thoms explores the cult of Graham and her dancing through a critical lens that exposes the gendered meaning behind much of her work. Thoms synthesizes a diverse archive of material on Graham from films, photographs, memoir, and critique in order to uniquely highlight her contribution to the dance world and arts culture in general.

Source: http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/books/view-Book,id=4981/, 23/6/15

Studying Disability Arts & Culture : an introduction
Petra Kuppers

700.87 KUP
Main Book Collection

In this accessible introduction to the study of Disability Arts and Culture, Petra Kuppers foregrounds themes, artists and theoretical concepts in this diverse field. Complete with case studies, exercises and questions for further study, the book introduces students to the work of disabled artists and their allies, and explores artful responses to living with physical, cognitive, emotional or sensory difference.

Engaging readers as cultural producers, Kuppers provides useful frameworks for critical analysis and encourages students to explore their own positioning within the frames of gender, race, sexuality, class and disability.

Comprehensive and accessible, this is an essential handbook for undergraduate students or anyone interested in disabled bodies and minds in theatre, performance, creative writing, art and dance.

Source: http://www.palgrave.com/page/detail/studying-disability-arts-and-culture-petra-kuppers/?isb=9781137413468, 23/6/15

The Choreographic
Jenn Joy

The Choreographic

792.82 JOY
Main Book Collection

The choreographic stages a conversation in which artwork is not only looked at but looks back; it is about contact that touches even across distance. The choreographic moves between the corporeal and cerebral to tell the stories of these encounters as dance trespasses into the discourse and disciplines of visual art and philosophy through a series of stutters, steps, trembles, and spasms.

In The Choreographic, Jenn Joy examines dance and choreography not only as artistic strategies and disciplines but also as intrinsically theoretical and critical practices. She investigates artists in dialogue with philosophy, describing a movement of conceptual choreography that flourishes in New York and on the festival circuit.

Joy offers close readings of a series of experimental works, arguing for the choreographic as an alternative model of aesthetics. She explores constellations of works, artists, writers, philosophers, and dancers, in conversation with theories of gesture, language, desire, and history. She choreographs a revelatory narrative in which Walter Benjamin, Pina Bausch, Francis Alÿs, and Cormac McCarthy dance together; she traces the feminist and queer force toward desire through the choreography of DD Dorvillier, Heather Kravas, Meg Stuart, La Ribot, Miguel Gutierrez, luciana achugar, and others; she maps new forms of communicability and pedagogy; and she casts science fiction writers Samuel R. Delany and Kim Stanley Robinson as perceptual avatars and dance partners for Ralph Lemon, Marianne Vitali, James Foster, and Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller. Constructing an expanded notion of the choreographic, Joy explores how choreography as critical concept and practice attunes us to a more productively uncertain, precarious, and ecstatic understanding of aesthetics and art making.

Source: https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/choreographic, 23/6/15

The Dance Theatre of Jean Cocteau
Frank W. D. Ries

792.8092 COC
Main Book Collection

In an artistic career spanning five decades, and for which he was best known as poet, artist, dramatist, designer and film-maker, Jean Cocteau was also involved, directly and indirectly, with nearly twenty ballets.

While he was not in the strictest sense a choreographer, his infl uence on such works asParade, Le Jeune homme et la mort, Orphée, and La Dame à la licorne was all pervasive – from the “poésie” of the dramatic action, to lighting, to costume and set design. His creations, in collaboration with composers and choreographers, were fully integrated theatre pieces.

Frank Ries has researched all of Cocteau’s ballets and, using interviews, Cocteau’s own writings, reviews and critiques – some of which have never before been translated – presents this survey and analysis of Cocteau’s involvement in the world of dance.

He re-creates, from a new perspective, a portrait of a poet charged by Serge Diaghilev in pre-World War I Paris to “Astonish me!” and who made that command the inspiration of his career in dance.

Source: http://www.dancebooks.co.uk/the-dance-theatre-of-jean-cocteau-p-376.html, 23/6/15

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