Books glorious books…

We’ve added some new books to the collections… why not pop down & take a peek at the new books display or the ‘what’s new’ section of the NSCD Library OPAC to find out what we’ve added?

These are just some of the new books we’ve added, click on the book covers to find out more about each title…

Javaphilia : American love affairs with Javanese music & dance
Henry Spiller

780.959.82 SPI
Main Book Collection

Fragrant tropical flowers, opulent batik fabrics, magnificent bronze gamelan orchestras, and, of course, aromatic coffee. Such are the exotic images of Java, Indonesia’s most densely populated island, that have hovered at the periphery of North American imaginations for generations. Through close readings of the careers of four “javaphiles”—individuals who embraced Javanese performing arts in their own quests for a sense of belonging—Javaphilia: American Love Affairs with Javanese Music and Dance explores a century of American representations of Javanese performing arts by North Americans. While other Asian cultures made direct impressions on Americans by virtue of firsthand contacts through immigration, trade, and war, the distance between Java and America, and the vagueness of Americans’ imagery, enabled a few disenfranchised musicians and dancers to fashion alternative identities through bold and idiosyncratic representations of Javanese music and dance.

Memory, space, sound
Johannes Brusila, et al (ed)

781 MEM
Main Book Collection

Memory, Space and Sound presents a collection of essays from scholars in a range of disciplines that together explore the social, spatial, and temporal contexts that shape different forms of music and sonic practice. The contributors deploy different theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches from musicology, ethnomusicology, popular music studies, cultural history, media studies, and cultural studies as they analyze an array of examples, including live performances, music festivals, audiovisual material, and much more.

Moving consciously : somatic transformations through dance, yoga, & touch
Sondra Fraleigh

615.82 ATT
Main Book Collection

The popularity of yoga and Zen meditation has heightened awareness of somatic practices. Individuals develop the conscious embodiment central to somatics work via movement and dance, or through touch from a skilled teacher or therapist often called a somatic bodyworker. Methods of touch and movement foster generative processes of consciousness in order to create a fluid interconnection between sensation, thought, movement, and expression.

In Moving Consciously, Sondra Fraleigh gathers essays that probe ideas surrounding embodied knowledge and the conscious embodiment of movement and dance. Using a variety of perspectives on movement and dance somatics, Fraleigh and other contributors draw on scholarship and personal practice to participate in a multifaceted investigation of a thriving worldwide phenomenon. Their goal: to present the mental and physical health benefits of experiencing one’s inner world through sensory awareness and movement integration.

A stimulating addition to a burgeoning field, Moving Consciously incorporates concepts from East and West into a timely look at life-changing, intertwined practices that involve dance, movement, performance studies, and education.

Contributors: Richard Biehl, Robert Bingham, Hillel Braude, Alison East, Sondra Fraleigh, Kelly Ferris Lester, Karin Rugman, Catherine Schaeffer, Jeanne Schul, and Ruth Way.

Attending to movement : somatic perspectives on living in this world
Sarah Whatley, et al (ed)

615.82 MOV
Main Book Collection

This edited collection draws on the conference, Attending to Movement: Somatic Perspectives on Living in this World, run at C-DaRE, the Centre for Dance Research, Coventry University, 12 – 14 July, 2013.

Somatic practitioners, dance artists and scholars from a wide range of subject domains cross discipline borders and investigate the approaches that embodied thinking and action can offer to philosophical and socio-cultural inquiry.

The book celebrates and builds upon the work of visionary dance artist, teacher and scholar Gill Clarke (1954 –2011), who championed the value of somatic approaches within and beyond dance education and creative practice.

Body & performance 
Sandra Reeve (ed)

792.028 BOD
Main Book Collection

12 contemporary approaches to the human body that are being used by performers or in the context of performance training.

The second in a series of books entitled: Ways of Being a Body.

Following on from Sandra Reeve’s Nine Ways of Seeing a Body (which offered a historical perspective on different key approaches to the body over time), this new edited collection brings together a wide range of contemporary approaches to the body that are being used by performers or in the context of performance training.

The intention is for students, dancers, performers, singers, musicians, directors and choreographers to locate their own preferred approach(es) to the body-in-performance amongst the lenses described here. The collection is also designed to facilitate further research  in that direction as well as to signpost alternatives that might enrich their current vocabulary.

All 12 approaches represent the praxis and research of their authors. The chapters reveal a wide variety of different interests but they share the common framework of the notion of ‘body as flux’, of ‘no fixed or determined sense of self’ and of supporting the performer’s being-becoming-being as a skilful creative entity, emphasising the intelligence of the body at work.

The performing subject in the space of technology : through the virtual, towards the real
Matthew Causey, et al (ed)

700.105 PER
Main Book Collection

This book reflects on the aftermath of shifts encountered in the maturing of digital culture in areas of critical theory and artistic practices, focusing on the awareness that contemporary subjectivity is one that dwells within both the virtual and the real.

Now that the shock of the virtual has subsided toward a ‘new-normal’ of computational interference in all areas of life, it is an advantageous moment to reflect on the passage through the virtual and back to the real. Digital culture has developed into a bio-virtual environment in which the categories of the biological and the virtual no longer stand as separate. The contributors to this volume respond to the questions raised by the ‘after-event’ of the digital through practice-led research analyses of performance processes, philosophical readings of the work of art and technology, and performance studies investigations of the subject in the spaces of technology. The volume examines a wide range of activities, from bio-art to internet child pornography, gaming and social networking technologies to the use of motion-tracking in developing choreography and documentation. The authors draw from diverse perspectives in dance, theatre, performance, film and music studies, digital arts and culture.

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